Tag Archives: Hans Zimmer

“The Dark Knight Rises” – film review

“I once caught a bat THIS BIG

I still remember the slightly dazed feeling that Mrs Rolling Eyeballs and I had after going to the Vue cinema in Sheffield to see Christopher Nolan‘s dizzying, operatic “Batman Begins” sequel, “The Dark Knight“, in summer 2008.

It was a Sunday lunchtime, Batman was in the wind after sorting out the Harvey Dent situation and there was this distinct sense between us of having just been put through the wringer.  Had we just been entertained for two and a half hours or been through a punishing, sensory obstacle course?

The same feeling struck me after emerging from this morning’s screening of the third movie in Nolan’s series based on the DC comics character, The Dark Knight Rises“.

It needs to be said that this is an excellent film – a worthy cherry on top of the proverbial trilogy cake – but it’s an exhausting one which demands a lot of the audience, in terms of memory and ability to not visit the bathroom several times (forego the Super Gulp cup at your concessions stand – you will miss stuff if you have to visit the facilities during the film).  There’s no walking into this film green – you really do have to refresh your memory of “Batman Begins”, as it plays a significant part in proceedings, and it helps to have an appreciation of Harvey Dent, too.  It’s not as though there’s an exam paper to sit as you leave, but it will help to have some recollection of how our hero got to this point in this life and to know who the characters are, as introductions are sketchy at best. This is particularly true if the people in your party are not quite as geeky as the rest of us – you’ll be explaining a lot to them and missing things yourself.

The scale of the enterprise is what surprised me – we’ve all read those pre-release puff-pieces which seek to convince that “Summer Blockbuster X” sets the bar incredibly high and that we’re going to see things that we’ve never seen on-screen before – usually this translates as ‘canned special effects sequence marginally more entertaining than the one in that film we were conned into seeing last year’.  With “The Dark Knight Rises” I actually believe the hype for once – I’ve can’t recall having seen a film which has action set-pieces of the scale and duration seen during the last act in this film.  Big isn’t necessarily better, but Nolan’s taut command of the toy box at his disposal on “TDKR” makes the likes of “Transformers 3” seem even more weightless and juvenile than it already was, despite both films dealing in similar scenes of extended metropolitan destruction.

The performances match up to the apocalyptic imagery on display – Christian Bale is excellent and fully justifies Nolan’s initial decision to cast him with the rounded, nuanced turn he delivers here.  He’s beaten, bloodied and bowed by the demands and toll that his by-night vigilante campaign has taken on his body and mind – this is a Batman who wants out from the life he’s created for himself and finds that a wider world has something quite different to say about that.

Leaving on a jet plane? Anne Hathaway as Selina Kyle in “The Dark Knight Rises”

He’s more than complemented by Anne Hathaway, who defies a million dim-witted fanboy forum posts by making the role of Selina Kyle/Catwoman her own – slinky, sarcastic, haunted, defiant, conflicted, capable and able to walk in heels that even Lady Gaga might deem a bit complicated, this is a Catwoman quite distinctively different to those we’ve seen before in Bat-Cinema, TV and games.  There’s an exchange of dialogue between her and Joseph Gordon Levitt‘s idealistic policeman mid-way through the film which goes past beyond the sexy cat burglar archetype to hint at Kyle’s essential dilemna in this telling of the tale – she’s brilliant at what she does, but what she does puts her in situations which can’t help but keep her in the mire that she’s trying to escape.

Best Catwoman ever?  Your mileage may vary, but I thought that she was wonderful and that Hathaway did splendid work in the role.  Even the ears worked.  Kind of.

Tom Hardy is fantastic as the force of nature Bane – he’s got layers of character which haven’t been hinted at in the pre-publicity and their unpicking on-screen is a delight, giving this unaccountably posh berserker man-mountain an array of quotable and – get this – easy to understand dialogue.  It’s a strong actor indeed who can command the screen and hold the attention with much of his face replaced by a high-tech dog muzzle and Hardy manages to do it consistently – he’s helped, of course, by his imposing physical presence.  The words ‘Brick’ and ‘Outhouse’ come to mind.

Is this a good ending to the Nolan trilogy?  I would say so – but it’s not without some dodgy moments.  I thought that we were going to have a retread of  the second film’s “Which boat shall we blow up? The one with the rapists and murderers or the ‘Ickle Kittens and Orphans’ cruise?” moral non-quandry at one point, but we got past it swiftly.  There’s some fairly on-the-nose dialogue to contend with, too – you may wonder if Bane’s job is to defeat Batman or engage in some kind of unorthodox, “The Game”-style Billionaire Life Coach programme with him, given the steady stream of tough love aphorisms he delivers in their scenes together.   And Hans Zimmer‘s score is so overwrought that any metalhead listening will wonder why they didn’t save a few bob and just sling some Dimmu Borgir on the soundtrack – the aural, cumulative effect is noticeably similar.

I will want to revisit this film, but I suspect that a little distance will certainly help me to appreciate it all the more – it’s big with a capital B and such an endeavour deserves to have a little gulf between viewings, I think.  If “The Avengers” was like the best chocolate cake ever (with extra sprinkles), “The Dark Knight Rises” is like a delicious pasta dish with such a rich tomato sauce that you can’t face any other course afterwards.

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Assembly Music

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Yay for targeted marketing!   In a perfect storm of nerdery, questionable taste in music (mine) and first week sales promotions, the good people at Amazon had a deal this week which offered both the Alan Silvestri original score for “The Avengers and the rock-focussed “Music From and Inspired By” soundtrack album for the princely sum of £10.00 on the MP3 store.

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Click > Add to Cart > Sold!

The Alan Silvestri score is very solid stuff, if ever so slightly reminiscent of his previous work – you might well find yourself going “Hmm…that sounds very much like the music from Back to the Future, don’t you know?”.  I’m quite fond of Black Widow‘s theme – “Red Ledger”, a percussive action piece called “Assault” and all of the pieces which accompany that thing with the stuff (I don’t wish to spoil the movie for anybody who hasn’t seen it yet, but “Assemble” and “One Way Trip” are adrenaline-racing fare and score some of the most air-punching/nail-biting bits of the film’s climax).

As to whether you would like this album – do you like to wash dishes and pots to Murray Gold‘s “I Am The Doctor” and Hans Zimmer‘s “The End?” (from the recent Sherlock Holmes sequel)?   You do?  Get on this score – it’s right up your alley.

They will rock you and break your face if you don’t like it – Five Finger Death Punch

Now to the more divisive release of the two.  I’ve written a yippy-skippy piece about the “Music From And Inspired By” soundtrack album previously and I have to admit that I’ve lost none of my affection for it now that it’s on my iPod.  Well, let me clarify that – I could have done without Five Finger Death Punch‘s cover version of Faith No More‘s classic “From Out Of Nowhere”, which is clearly a case of a band turning in their take of a song which they loved in their formative years.  I don’t hate Five Finger Death Punch as much it is now apparently the law to do – never heard much by them, to be honest – but equally I’m not sure that the world needs a gruff, heads-down cover of a nuanced, singular song by one of the most underrated bands of the last twenty years.  If you love Ivan, Zoltan and the boys, your mileage may vary.

No, I’m going to keep my ire firmly for dreadful British hipster dreck Kasabian – they appear on the ‘international’ version of the soundtrack with their tune ‘Pistols at Dawn‘ and will be getting resolutely skipped from here forth: I’m not a fan, oddly enough.   In the context of the record – Shinedown, Evanescence, Buckcherry – wouldn’t a band like Halestorm be a lock for inclusion?  I suppose that I’m just grouchy because there’s not even a hint of DragonForce or Pythia on the soundtrack…

It is very much as you would expect, in fact – targeted at a variety of rock fans, with the younger set taken care of via everyone’s favourite Motley Crue tribute band, Black Veil Brides (for all my snarking, their song “Unbroken” is catchy as hell) and the aforementioned FFDP.  Their older brothers and sisters get Papa RoachRise Against (who somehow pull off being punky, poetic, anthemic and grumpy all at the same time – kudos!), Shinedown (really quite liked their song, “I’m Alive”) and Soundgarden to bump in their Ford pick-up trucks.

Bush are still around and sounding not terribly different from their heyday and the smattering of newer artists – Cherri Bomb, PusherJones and Redlight King – don’t amaze particularly but don’t offend either.  Cherri Bomb being the pick of that crop, for me at least.

In short – I quite liked the soundtrack.  It’s a promotional tie-in for a huge juggernaut of a movie but I liked a lot of the stuff on here and would recommend it to folks who want to check out bands they’re not currently into (Shinedown, on this evidence, will be a band I might want to have a longer listen to).  And I’d certainly sub-out Kasabian for Theory of a Deadman (who are on the US release), coolness be damned.

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